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GARP SCR Exam: Can you answer these practice questions?

Updated: Feb 22


GARP SCR Exam: Can you answer these practice questions?
GARP SCR Exam: Can you answer these practice questions?

The Sustainability and Climate Risk (SCR) Certificate is a professional certification program offered by the Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP). The GARP SCR Exam is a three-hour, computer-based test that assesses candidates' knowledge and skills in sustainability and climate risk management.

The SCR Exam is designed for a broad audience of professionals who are interested in or already working in the field of sustainability and climate risk management. This includes professionals in finance, risk management, investment management, sustainability, environmental management, and other related fields.


Benefits of SCR Certification

Earning the GARP SCR Certificate can provide several benefits, including:

  • Enhanced career prospects: SCR certification can help you stand out from the competition and advance your career in sustainability and climate risk management.

  • Increased earning potential: SCR-certified professionals may command higher salaries than their non-certified counterparts.

  • Greater credibility: SCR certification demonstrates your expertise in sustainability and climate risk management to employers, clients, and investors.

Sustainability and climate risk are important for businesses and investors to consider for a number of reasons.

Sustainability

  • Financial performance: Sustainable businesses can be more profitable in the long run by reducing their environmental impact and improving their social performance.

  • Reputation management: Sustainable businesses can attract and retain customers, employees, and investors by demonstrating their commitment to environmental and social responsibility.

  • Regulatory compliance: Businesses are increasingly facing regulations related to sustainability, and compliance with these regulations can be costly if not planned for.

Climate risk

  • Financial risk: Climate change can lead to a number of financial risks for businesses, such as physical damage to assets, supply chain disruptions, and changes in consumer preferences.

  • Regulatory risk: Governments around the world are taking action to address climate change, and businesses that do not adapt to these changes could face regulatory penalties.

  • Reputational risk: Businesses that are seen as contributing to climate change could face reputational damage, which could harm their brand and customer relationships.

By considering sustainability and climate risk, businesses can make more informed decisions that can help them protect their financial performance, reputation, and long-term viability.


Do you have the skills and knowledge to be a Sustainability and Climate Risk expert? Test yourself with these five sample GARP SCR Practice Questions selected by FutureGreenWorld. Answers below.


1. In preparation for an upcoming global climate conference, organizers develop climate science training materials for business executives. How should the training material compare anthropogenic and natural climate changes?


A. It is still to be assessed and concluded if human activities have any impact on temperature change

B. Human activities caused temperature changes greater than any previous natural temperature changes.

C. Human-induced warming currently exhibits a nonlinear relationship with global CO2 levels, whereas natural warming shows a linear relationship.

D. Human activities slow water vapor feedback, whereas natural climate changes do not alter water vapor balance.



2. A major factory utilizes a considerable quantity of freshwater for its boiler operations. To assess the environmental consequences of human-caused water vapor emissions, the company commissions an intern to conduct a study. The intern's report presents the following observations:


A. Water vapor direct emissions from human activities contribute essentially nothing to its atmospheric abundance.

B. Water vapor released by humans has a direct impact on the temperature of the surroundings.

C. Water vapor released by humans increases the chance of precipitation and causes the risk of floods in the surroundings.

D. Water vapor emissions from human activities contribute heavily to the surrounding temperature.


3. What is the most cited and widely accepted definition of sustainable development?


A. Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs

B. Development that overburdens the natural environment

C. Development that places social and justice concerns above the natural environment

D. Development that prioritizes economic outcomes over the natural environment


4. What information is needed to assess the vulnerability of the physical assets to climate risks?


A. Location Data

B. Adaptive infrastructure information

C. Climate engineering evaluations

D. All of the above


5. What is the main challenge for firms in energy-intensive industries in the net-zero transition?


A. Understanding the scope 3 emissions in products

B. Developing alternatives to current production processes

C. Minimizing scope 1 emissions

D. Understanding the assumptions, models, and limitations in the financial sector


 






Answers:

1. B. Human activities caused temperature changes greater than any previous natural temperature changes. Human activities accelerated the temperature change. In fact, it has been 16 times faster since the last ice age. The correct answer, option B, accurately reflects the scientific consensus that human activities have caused a significant increase in global temperatures, far exceeding any warming caused by natural factors. This understanding is crucial for business executives to grasp as they make decisions about their companies' climate strategies.

Here's a summary of the key points to emphasize when comparing anthropogenic and natural climate changes:

  • Human activities are the primary cause of recent climate change.

  • The impact of human activities on temperature change has been far greater than any previous natural change.

  • The rate of human-induced warming is accelerating.


2. A. Water vapor's direct emissions from human activities contribute essentially nothing to its atmospheric abundance. Water vapor emissions directly from human activities have a negligible impact on its atmospheric abundance. Water vapor is a natural part of the atmosphere, and human activities only contribute a small fraction of total water vapor emissions.


3. A. Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The Club of Rome report, the Commission’s final report, released in 1987, proclaimed sustainable development to be compatible with economic growth and defined it as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (Brundtland, 1987). This has since become the most cited and widely accepted definition of sustainable development.


4. D. All of the above. To assess the vulnerability of the physical assets to climate risk, location data, adaptive infrastructure information, and climate engineering evaluations are all necessary. To assess the vulnerability of the physical assets to climate risks, we need to know the location of the assets, the adaptive infrastructure around them, and the climate engineering evaluations.

  • Location Data is important because it helps us to understand the physical risks that the asset is exposed to. For example, a coastal asset is at risk of sea level rise and storm surges, while an inland asset is at risk of extreme heat events and droughts.

  • Adaptive infrastructure information is important because it helps us to understand how resilient the asset is to climate risks. For example, a coastal asset with seawalls and flood pumps is more resilient to sea level rise and storm surges than an asset without these defenses.

  • Climate engineering evaluations are important because they help us to understand the potential impact of climate risks on the asset. For example, a climate engineering evaluation can tell us how much damage a sea level rise of one meter would cause to a coastal asset.

By understanding the location, adaptive infrastructure, and climate engineering of an asset, we can assess its vulnerability to climate risks and develop strategies to mitigate those risks.


5. B. Developing alternatives to current production processes, which requires investing in technological innovation and developing solutions that are less emission-intensive. Energy-intensive industries are responsible for a significant portion of global greenhouse gas emissions. In order to achieve net-zero emissions, these industries will need to make significant changes to their production processes. This will require a lot of research and development, as well as investment in new technologies.






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